D00057 Turner Bequest V D. Black and white chalks on brown laid wrapping paper, 419 x 269 mm Watermarked with an ornamented fleur-de-lys (in a shield surmounted by a crown) Inscribed in red ink ‘V.D’ bottom right Stamped in black ‘V D’ bottom right . Famous fans of the Belvedere Torso Because online photos showing Rodin’s studio never seem to lack for figures à la antique with missing heads or limbs. It is now in the Museo Pio-Clementino (Inv. Plate IX. Statue Group. The Greek torso sculpture was created by Apollonius, the sculptor from Athens. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Belvedere-Torso, The Metropolitan Museum of Art - The Apollo Belvedere from the Vatican his left hand resting on the tree trunk around which coils a python. Corrections? Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. "Apollo's Archaic Torso" is by a young Yorkshire writer, Sarah Stutt, who recently completed an MA in Creative Writing at the University of Hull. Michelangelo's admiration of the Torso was widely known in his lifetime,[8] to the extent that the Torso gained the sobriquet, "The School of Michelangelo". The Belvedere Torso was another statue found unceremoniously in the 15th century and brought to the Vatican by Pope Clement in 1523. Image released under Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND (3.0 Unported) License this image. Torso Belvedere. In Tate Britain. The Head and Torso of the Apollo Belvedere ?1792. [11], How it entered the Vatican collections is uncertain, but by the mid-16th century it was installed in the Cortile del Belvedere, where it joined the Apollo Belvedere and other famous Roman sculptures. [3], The statue is documented in the collection of Cardinal Prospero Colonna at his family's palazzo in Monte Cavallo, Rome from 1433,[4] not because it elicited admiration but because an antiquarian epigrapher, Ciriaco d'Ancona (or someone in his immediate circle) made note of its inscription;[5] a generation later it began its career as a catalyst of the classical revival. Dahesh Museum of Art. It was rediscovered in the mid 15th century in the private collection of Cardinal Prospero Colonna in Rome. Belvedere Torso (foreground at right) in a capriccio by Giovanni Paolo Panini. Belvedere Torso, Hellenistic sculpture fragment of a male nude (5 feet 2 5/8 inches [1.59 m] high) in the Vatican Museum; the work is signed by the Athenian sculptor Apollonius the son of Nestor and was long thought to be a 1st-century- bc original. Updates? The first work I applied myself to in Rome was describing the statues in the Belvedere, namely the Apollo, the Laocoon, the so-called Antinous, and this torso, as the most prefect examples of ancient sculpture. He respectfully declined, stating that it was too beautiful to be altered, and instead used it as the inspiration for several of the figures on the Sistine Chapel ceiling, including the Sibyls and Prophets along the borders, and both the risen Christ and St. Bartholomew in The Last Judgement. Though traditionally identified as a Heracles seated on the skin of the Nemean lion, recent studies[citation needed] have identified the skin as that of a panther, occasioning other identifications (with possibilities including Hercules, Polyphemus and Marsyas). Wrestlers. "[12], Several small bronze reductions of it were made during the 16th century,[13] often restoring it as a seated Hercules. From then until the 19th century it was widely regarded as one of the greatest works of art in the world, rivalled in status probably only by the Apollo Belvedere and the Laocoön among ancient sculptures, although its fame was generally more academic than popular. [14], The Belvedere Torso visited the British Museum for their 2015 exhibition on the human body in ancient Greek art.[15]. Noted in Francis Haskell and Nicholas Penny, The earliest dated sketches show the right leg intact through the knee. Belvedere Torso, Hellenistic sculpture fragment of a male nude (5 feet 2 5/8 inches [1.59 m] high) in the Vatican Museum; the work is signed by the Athenian sculptor Apollonius the son of Nestor and was long thought to be a 1st-century-bc original. Black Friday Sale! Engraving. For its Renaissance career, Barkan 1999:190ff. And yet his torso is still suffused with brilliance from inside, like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low, gleams in all its power. Study after the Belevedere Torso by Peter Paul Rubens, Metropolitan Museum of Art. We cannot know his legendary head with eyes like ripening fruit. The Belvedere Torso is a fragment of a nude male statue, signed prominently on the front of the base by an Athenian sculptor "Apollonios son of Nestor", who is unmentioned in ancient literature. Archaic Torso of Apollo. Drawing after the Belvedere Torso by Peter Paul Rubens, Rubenshuis (RH.S.109). The Apollo Belvedere (also called the Pythian Apollo or Apollo of the Belvedere) is a celebrated marble sculpture from Classical Antiquity. Premium Membership is now 50% off! Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856. Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree.... …4th-century sculptor Praxiteles, and the. The figure is portrayed seated on an animal hide, and its precise identification remains open to debate. I provide here a description of the famous torso in the Belvedere, which is generally called the Torso of Michelangelo, because this work was especially highly regarded … The identity of the figure has been the subject of various interpretations through the centuries. "The Laocoön took two months from unearthing to Belvedere canonization," Leonard Barkan observed, "the Torso took a hundred years. Alternatively, it may be some … By Carl Skoggard 06/22/2019. The engraving by, Noted by A. D. Potts, "Greek Sculpture and Roman Copies I: Anton Raphael Mengs and the Eighteenth Century". Print of the Belvedere Torso; Domenico De Rossi, Raccolta del Scultore Antiche e Moderne. The Belvedere Torso, marble, c. 2 nd century BC, Vatican Museum (picture taken with my phone May 2013) There were many fascinating artworks when we were looking at ancient Greece and Rome, but somehow the one that made the strongest impression on me was a legless, armless and even headless fragment of a statue, The Belvedere Torso. [10] The Belvedere Torso remains one of the few ancient sculptures admired in the 17th and 18th centuries whose reputation has not suffered in modern times. It has always been the piece of ancient sculpture most admired by artists right down to the present day. Young Official. The presentation of each statue was intended to be in two parts: the first concerning its ideal aspect, and the second its artistic qualities. Victory of Brescia . So, you might hear of it referred to the Apollo Belvedere Torso. [7], Between 1523 and 1534, the sculpture was in the Vatican. Early drawings of the Torso were made by Amico Aspertini, c. 1500–03, by Martin van Heemskerck, c. 1532–36, by Hendrick Goltzius, c. 1590; the Belvedere Torso ent… Critics have suggested that Rilke was inspired by the Belvedere Torso or by some truncated piece of ancient classical sculpture in the Louvre. 1192) of the Vatican Museums. Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). 1704. 1515. Early drawings of the Torso were made by Amico Aspertini, c. 1500–03, by Martin van Heemskerck, c. 1532–36, by Hendrick Goltzius, c. 1590; the Belvedere Torso entered the visual repertory of connoisseurs and artists unable to go to Rome through the engraving of it by Giovanni Antonio da Brescia, c. Prints and Drawings Room View by appointment. Zeus And Ganymede. The Apollo Belvedere depicts the Greek god Apollo as a standing archer, having just shot his arrow. For example a bronze statuette formerly in the von Pannwitz collection, by a follower of, http://mv.vatican.va/3_EN/pages/x-Schede/MPCs/MPCs_Sala06_01.html, https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/jan/08/belvedere-torso-british-museum-body-exhibition, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Belvedere_Torso&oldid=962330853, Roman copies of 2nd-century BC Greek sculptures, Articles with unsourced statements from July 2012, Articles with unsourced statements from October 2019, Italy articles missing geocoordinate data, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 13 June 2020, at 12:18. The Belvedere Torso. West Pediment, Temple of Zeus, Olympia (1) West Pediment, Temple of Zeus, Olympia (3) West Pediment, Temple of Zeus, Olympia (Apollo) Westmacott Ephebe.